Sports & Performance Psychologist John Stevenson on the Shaun Newman Podcast

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist interview on the Shaun Newman Podcast.

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Transcribed with permission.

Shaun Newman:

He currently resides in Edmonton Alberta, a former goalie who played for st. FX. He has his master’s in sports psychology and a master’s in counseling psychology. So worked with the Royal Winnipeg ballet, Alberta chartered accountants, question writers, volleyball, basketball and hockey players, a former goalie coach for the Ottawa senators and Edmonton Oilers. He spent many years working in the WHL as well. He’s most notable for his work with Brayden Hopi and Carter heart. I’m talking about John Stevenson. So buckle up. Here we go.

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

This is John Stevenson and welcome to the Shawn Newman podcast.

Shaun Newman:

Welcome to the Shawn Newman podcast today. I’m joined by mr. John Stevenson. So first off thanks for hopping on.

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

Thank you for having me on your show. Thanks so much

Shaun Newman:

Now, before we even started, I had a couple of different little fun things to get going with, but you mentioned you’ve never tried alcohol before. Like never a drop

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

Accidentally. Once I thought somebody had said there was a a Coke and the Coke for me. So I took it and sure enough, it was a rum and Coke. And that was the only time I, and I was like, ah, and like I was the only time I’ve ever touched alcohol. Unfortunately I lost a friend when he was 16 years old. And his mom at purposely had an, an open casket service and this is going to sound a little bit strange, but he was a really good looking guy and he was like, he, he did a lot of modeling actually. And when they had the service, you walk by and you’re like, who, who was that? And not to be disrespectful, but it was just, it was just I to this day, it just gives me chills. And that was kind of the, the first thing that made me aware of, of alcohol. And to this day it just has a very sad and lingering effect. And literally he had to beer that night and he just went off a country road and unfortunately killed himself.

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

And I w you had knew. And I had mentioned before, like I went to st Francis Xavier university and kind of a wake-up call. I, I had saw a lot of stuff on the campus. Just a lot of negative stuff with alcohol involved and that just, again, reassured like reaffirmed for me that I can have fun without it. I’ve never touched drugs. I’ve never touched alcohol. And I was still as were kind of things you know, playing hockey and I grew up in Sherwood park. I grew, I grew up in Toronto first, but I grew up in Sherwood park and, and I’m sure you, you know, you go to these Bush, Bush parties and stuff like that. And just from my, from my perspective, I just didn’t see a lot of great, great stuff around it. And so that’s that’s how I just chose not to, to get involved in that I could. And for me, I thought I could just, and I did, I had just as much fun without it. I think sometimes some people thought I was I had know that that was kind of my experience around that.

Shaun Newman:

It’s, it’s interesting because well, alcohol is just so commonplace. It’s just, it is. And I mean I think of myself, I played senior hockey and my hometown of Hillman Saskatchewan for nine years. And one of my favorite parts was the socializing after just having a beer or two in the dressing room. It’s, those will be some of my best memories, which is odd to say, you know when I look back on life, like I had so much fun in that dressing room sitting and getting to know guys over a couple of sociables and no, I,

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

And it’s funny, you mentioned that Sean, because I, in some ways in my, in my hockey circles it hurt me because you’re right. There’s, there’s that part of the hockey aspect hockey world. And I think once guys got to know me you know, in part of it, I ended up being the designated driver, but at first it was it was odd. It was weird. You know, cause I don’t know what your feelings are, but in some ways, alcoholic and hockey worse than autonomous you know, like, like I said, not anything negative, but that’s, you know, what you did and you know, whether you’re playing beer league afterwards or things like that. But yeah, and I, and I know when I was in the national hockey league you know, there’s that social aspect. And I think for some people in a lot of ways, it made them feel very uncomfortable that I, that I didn’t drink that I didn’t get involved.

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

I wasn’t one of the boys. And I won’t mention the team, but I, but I think it did, it did hurt me that way, that I, you know, I was kind of on the, on the outside because I didn’t drink alcohol, but that was, that’s fine. That’s, that’s, that’s me. I didn’t have to, you know, and it’s something that I work with my clients, you don’t have to you know, like a lot of the kids right now, you know, Minecraft Fortnite call of duty. I’ve been really, really emphasizing how much disk can have such a huge negative impact on your brain functioning. And just because, you know, Joe blow across the street is doing it doesn’t mean you have to do it. And I, and I share my experience and I, and I do, I get a lot of looks like, come on, you’ve never touched alcohol before. And it’s like, no, it’s something that wasn’t, you know, a part of me, I would get my, I get my high now by going swimming in mountain glacier lakes and the way, and the Wim Hof method that I’m doing now, the breath work that I do, that’s my kind of way of, of getting high on your own supply as, as when would, when would say,

Shaun Newman:

Well, Wim, Hoff I’ve watched your videos of swimming in the lakes. I don’t know if anyone’s tried going into an ice bath before, or even when they had that. Oh, what was it? The ice challenge years back where the polar, the polar one that’s right. Like like that is a shock to the system and the breathing that comes with it. I can just like, remember like vividly getting in a cold tub and the breathing that comes with it. So it’s interesting. You mentioned synonymous with hockey. I, I, I would agree a hundred percent with you. I think it was rod Peterson on her. He used to be the former voice of the rough riders, and now he’s got his rod Peterson show actually. And he was saying that he got offered. So he loses his job with the rough riders and way with becoming essentially an alcoholic.

Shaun Newman:

And then he quits being an alcoholic. So he’s sober now for many, many years and loses job with rough riders and gets offered a job with an NHL team. Then they find out that he doesn’t drink and they, they basically stopped talking to him and, and then you know, it goes along and, and he talks more about it. I’m not trying to crap on the NHL by any stretch of imagination, just that drinking is a way you find notable people, right. It kind of lets their guard down. And you, you kind of have this, I’m assuming that the cigar room once upon a time was the same, the same thing, you know, like it’s just like little club. And if you get inside of it and you have a cigar, you kinda, that’s a safe space and, and alcohol for a lot of people has become, you know, we’ve been drinking for a lot of years of the human experience and it’s a, it’s a safe space for a lot of people now, does it get abused?

Shaun Newman:

Absolutely. Is there a lot of negative that comes with it? Oh yeah. And so for you to, I find it, I just find it unique and I like unique. It’s, it’s interesting. And there’s always a story behind why somebody thinks the way they do. And you’re a guy who focuses a lot on the brain and how to strengthen it and how to treat it like a muscle that you, you work out and you build it and it takes time. And so I enjoy it. And appreciate you sharing about your friend because things like that stick with people for a long, a long time.

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

It did, it had a huge impact on my life and, and a lot of my friends at the time too, it was I think we were, we were, we were, we were literally shocked and his mom did mention afterwards, she she did it purposely. She wanted to send a message to two young people at that time. This is, this is unfortunately what can happen and it’s your main and impact on my life. Right.

Shaun Newman:

Well, I think, you know, I got three young kids and I think as soon as you become a parent, you worry about things. Even when they’re two years old, you’re like, man, when they get to certain ages, like how do you keep them away from XYZ? Like how, how do you stop them from doing the stupid things that most of us have probably done and survived. And I remember seeing a chart that the death rate between, I think it’s like for males, it’s like 16, like 22, the death rate just skyrockets. And then it comes way back down. And there’s this like window where man, that’s tough. And I don’t know, that’s being a young kid and going and experiencing things. I mean, you start working with, with young kids right away on, on how to strengthen their, I dunno, am I saying it right, John, when I say strengthen their brain? Absolutely. And

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

On the other side of our clinic, a lot of people don’t know, like we have zoned psych and then we have zone performance. And on the zone psych, I work with a lot of clinical basis. So anxiety, depression one of the biggest group of clients that we work with are ADHD clients and particularly young ADHD clients there, because their brain is really looking for stimulation. That’s where their brain literally, it’s not them. Their brain is literally more vulnerable, more supple electronics. And you you’ve seen we’ve, we’ve seen it at our clinic. You know, over the last, since COVID time the increase of screen time has dramatically improved, dramatically increased and the problem is, and then next thing you know it, it becomes this vicious cycle Shaun like they, because they’re not getting that good deep restorative sleep, you know, parents know all of a sudden, okay, they’re giving them, like, we just had a client the other day in our office or mom’s giving melatonin.

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

But here he is, he’s playing three to four hours of call of duty before he goes to go to bed and she did, and it didn’t really catch like she didn’t at all, like this is the connection. And then my concern as a, as a sports psychologist, as where I’ve had to bring the sports psychology world into the ADHD world you know, Braden Hopi is probably one of the best clients I’ve ever had with regards to mental rehearsal. His ability to visualize and literally, you know, see it and move it. I mean, it’s phenomenal. And, and I know this may sound like a leap, but when you look at these, you know, grand theft auto call of duty there from a first person point of view, and because the brain can’t tell the difference between what’s real and what’s imagined it’s very susceptible.

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

And I’m not saying it there’s a great debate out there does video gaming, does it cause you know, more violence. But my argument Sean is if you keep seeing that message, keeping that message can keep getting repeated to you. I think it can start to just become part of you. It like it doesn’t you know, when you’re seeing people, you know, like I was shocked when I watched this stuff, like people just getting killed and killed and killed, but there’s no consequences, but the scary part is, you know, these games and this is what, and I would encourage all parents and kids to sit down and watch this program called the social dilemma. I don’t know if your, your family have seen it scaring the crap out of me.

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

Yeah. And the thing that I don’t know about you, Michelle, but the thing that really blew me away about that show was this wasn’t Joe blow at the bottom of the totem pole at Google, the, this, these were guys that were making, I’m sure a substantial amount of money and they walked away from it and because of the ethical and the moral dilemma. And I like, I’ve had a lot of kids since, you know, we’ve had, I’ve watched that show, but think about a week ago, 10 days ago. And I had no idea like they, they’re literally pro that they’re literally programming us. And so, you know, I want parents to know that screen time to be for ADHD kids and in the hockey world, Sean, like what blows me away. I go around and I do a lot of these, you know, workshops for teams parents and kids laugh.

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

They, they, they literally, they come on, like you are, you’re stretching it, aren’t you. And I think in the next 20 years, like when you were talking about your kids, I think in the next 20 years as a psychologist, I think that’s going to be one of the biggest issues that we’re going to be dealing with. That’s going to have serious, serious ramifications for mental health. And I call it electronics, YouTube gaming Instagram, tick talk. You, you, you name it, all of that. And I, it, it, it concerns me as, as a, as a, as a parent and as a, as a psychologist.

Shaun Newman:

Well, the technology is only getting better too. John, like the VR simulations, pretty soon you won’t, I mean, you can go down that rabbit hole pretty soon. You won’t be able to distinguish reality, real walking around here too. What’s in, what’s in a game because as that gets better and you can put a headset on and have an alternate life. I mean, we all joke about, you know, when I was growing up, I’m, I’m in my thirties 34 by no stretch of imagination in my old to some 20 year olds, I’m definitely over the Hill. But to most, I’m still a young guy when I was growing up, it was the Nintendo and it was pretty simplistic, right? Like, I mean, you’re married, you jump over some things. I still remember the Atari and like just like SIM simple, simple, simple. Now, you know, like we, we joke around like my oldest, brother’s 10 years older than me, and he’ll get playing a baseball game and you can do career mode.

Shaun Newman:

Heck they brought that out probably 10 years ago, right. Where you can have a person in a game and like lead an alternate life that just kind of escapes your life and, and allows you to just go into again, heck, and I’m not judging anyone. Cause sometimes you just need to just need to decompress and get away and video games and social media and everything else are lending that to us on a minute by minute basis. And the thing that always scares me about the screen time is your phone now will tell you how much screen time you have, and it can be hours upon hours and you’ll go, Oh yeah, that’s and you almost flip it away like that. Isn’t a big day, a big deal, but it’s like, wow. It says here that you spent four hours a day on your phone that’s should be alarming.

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

And the research and the research that I’ve, I just did a presentation for parents on ADHD and Wednesday Shannon. Any other research that I did leading up to that presentation is anything more than two hours a day really makes your brain vulnerable and

Shaun Newman:

Vulnerable, vulnerable to what

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

So what happens is you get these dopamine, you get the serotonin, you get, you get the chemical releases and so you get this hit and then guess what your brain wants more. And then next thing you know, it, it, it, you know, and I’ve had people come on, John it’s, it’s a half an hour it’s, you know, and next thing you know, it’s, it’s going up and up and up. And I mean, learning, if you’re not getting a good deep restorative sleep learning issues you know, if you’re sitting in front of the computer all day you know, they’ve shown obesity the blue light you know, here I am wearing glasses they, it has a lot of issues with regards to, you know, vision. There are so many issues that research has shown. But the one that scares me the most is, and especially for athletes, is it produces a lot more slower brainwave activity. So if you’re going up the level, you know, and you know this better than anybody from Adam AA to pee wee AA to a mate, well guess what’s happening to the game. It’s getting faster and faster and faster. And if you’re doing something that is making your brain slower, guests, guests

Shaun Newman:

That translates onto the ice

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

Time. And so it’s, to me, you know, we’ve got involved with companies now like neuro tracker, synaptic reflection, all these cognitive perceptual and what I would say to any of the kids, why don’t we do something that’s healthy for your brain rather than harmful? Let’s do some something that’s going to strengthen your brain, whether it be in the classroom or whether it be on the playing surface. You know, I have all the research that I’ve ever read or come across is it’s like you say, you don’t get rid of a behavior. You you’ve replaced it with a better, a better choice. And that’s what I’m trying to encourage kids is just make them, first of all, make them aware of the dangers and what I got from that social media, that social dilemma. I couldn’t believe that Sean, like there literally to the second, you know, monitoring how much time you’re on a screen and then they use it against you. I mean my staff member, she, she just joined about a month ago and already within that month, like yesterday I was on Facebook just to check campaign that we were looking and sure enough, her name came up as one of the ad friends. So like with literally within a month, like they they’ve got information on you. It’s almost like for me, you know, I’m 54, excuse me. It’s like big brother. And it’s like, I don’t know. It’s a,

Shaun Newman:

Yeah. Yeah. Well, we’ve all had the experience. I don’t think, I don’t think anyone in the modern era now with a phone attached to their hip, hasn’t had the experience where you mentioned Kellogg’s cornflakes. We’ll use something really random and within a day, within a minute or whatever the timeframe is for Kellogg’s cornflakes. And you’re like, well, that was weird, but you chalk it up to like, Oh, that was just whatever. But the more you go and dig into it and start to, you know, like the social dilemma, the more you start to look at, you’re like, Oh man, like, but how do you, how do you get away from it, right when the world functions around it now?

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

Well, and the other thing that you, you mentioned, Sean, is it’s the old cliche or phrase, you know, what you don’t use, you lose. And a lot of the schools now are going paperless. And if you’re not using this, you’re, you’re gonna to your cursive skills. How good

Shaun Newman:

Are your cursive skills, John?

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

It got a lot worse. It has been a lot worse

Shaun Newman:

When I, when I, when I had to write the essay T a C T the two tests there to get down in the States. One of the, one of the skills that you had to do on the test was just write a paragraph in cursive. I remember that. And I remember being like, Oh God, I’m like all right. And I wrote it. And I thought, you know, I thought my cursive was pretty poor, but I wrote it all. I mean, it was like riding a bike. I had to rethink about some things. And when I handed it in, that was back in 2006, 2007. Well, in those two years, the lady said, wow, your cursive is really good. And I remember thinking if that’s really good, imagine what everybody’s moving to. Well now, like we had to take cursive by like grade four or five.

Shaun Newman:

We were taking cursive every day at school. Now you talk about paperless wall. There’s no curse of being there’s no cursive. Heck I wonder why you don’t talk about even more paperless. We went to a hockey game and they’re not using right now. They’re not using paper fill out the teams, everything’s by computer. Right. And I know that’s very small scale. Believe me, that is a small skill, but that’s still a skill. And that’s still using your brain to write out the teams and know how to put things in everywhere. And automation is great, but you start pulling away all those, I go back to what you said. If you don’t use it, you lose it.

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

Yeah. Well, last, last Monday we had a soccer team in our cognitive perceptual trading room. They’re finished and it’s around eight o’clock at night and there’s four of them. And we’re bringing this up and take, take a guess how much on it on average showing each of these 15 year old boys had been on their phone that day,

Shaun Newman:

That day. Just that day. Yep. Two and a half hours.

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

Eight, eight to nine hours. Eight hours. Yes.

Shaun Newman:

Oh,

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

And that, that’s what scares me. And if you’re playing soccer and I know they’ve got into a lot of these debates about, you know, if you take heading out of soccer, you’re, you’re, you’re literally ruining the integrity of the game. It’s but you combine like, to me, it you’re doing something, you know, you’re constantly banging your head and, you know, and there there’s literally days, like we’ve had email soccer players are more vulnerable to hitting than male. And we’ve had literally coaches where they’ve just done a session that day on heading the ball. And there have been situations that I’ve seen over the years where girls are coming in the following day with, with headaches. And, and then again, now if you start adding that other piece to it it just concerns me that that’s, that’s the part that really concerns me.

Shaun Newman:

So if I heard that correct, what you’re saying is by us using technology for extended periods of time,

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

Or he’s using us for extended periods.

Shaun Newman:

Sure. Yes. Sure. Yeah, absolutely. And then adding in bumps and knocks to the head, those knots are becoming more problematic than before

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

I believe so. Yes. And I thought Oh, the movie that will Smith was

Shaun Newman:

Concussion. Yeah. Concussion, which is fantastic.

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

You know, when I saw that, I’ll be honest. I thought it was going to have more of an impact in the sports world. Well, w w what’s your thoughts? I, I actually thought it was gonna

Shaun Newman:

There’s too much money. That’s, that’s what I took from the movie. That’s what taken from everything that you, you want to talk about, whether you’re talking politics or you’re talking sports, when there’s that amount of money involved, that is a big machine and a will Smith character. And I’m forgetting the doctor, which is terrible of me, but his character ran into that. And that’s what you see throughout the movie. He does very good research, finds out a very troubling thing. But what, you know, they’re trying that professional sports is trying. Yeah. But part of the allure to professional sports and sports in general is, you know, football is a physical sport. Hockey is a physical sport. So the old part of me goes, well, what is hockey without hitting her? What does football without the bump and crash? I mean, it’s, it’s kind of archaic, but that’s the beauty part of it. But now what you’re saying is, is as we rely more on technology, you’re going to start to see more and more, or as technology uses us, you’re going to start to see more and more of these issues come to the forefront because our brains essentially are becoming, I don’t know if it’s the proper term, John, but you’re saying weaker,

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

More susceptible. You know, you’ve got that. It literally is in my opinion, digital heroin, and the argument that I had, like, cause I, I work with a lot of kids all over the world. And the, the argument that I kept hearing all the time, especially during COVID is, well, it gives them a form of connection with their friends. And he might, a lot of parents might get angry when I say this, but I literally had this one, one parent where I said, okay, would you willingly let your son or daughter go over to another friend’s house knowing that they were, you know, we’re talking 10 and 11 year old kids, knowing that they were going to smoke a bong, you know, do a bond that day. Because it was going to at least have them, let them have a social connection. And she was like, well, absolutely not. I’m saying that’s literally what this is like we we’ve had it’s not uncommon in my office right now, Sean, especially with my ADHD clients where you’re hearing six, seven hours a day, you know? And

Shaun Newman:

Is that, is that on parenting then John?

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

I like, boy, that’s it. You know, that’s a great question. I think you were talking about being judgmental to me. I I’m reluctant to say this, but yes, because I think in some ways, you know, like if mom knows that that young guy, the other day was playing three or four hours of call of duty every day. Right. I think it a little bit, I think it all backtrack a little bit. I think some parents really don’t know the ramifications that this can do

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

To the brain. It’s so like commodity, it’s a video game. It’s not that bad, but I think if all of a sudden the message gets out and we let people know you know how serious this is, but they still choose not to let you know to do something about it then that’s to me you know, like, I, I always say like with my presentations, I can’t tell you what to do, but what I want to do is give you the best, you know, all the information so that you can make a good informed choice, but we have seen it where all of a sudden the electronics now has become a babysitter. And that’s where you know, like even if there’s a toddler in the grocery store, well, let’s give them that device. That’ll keep them calm. Well, no, that’s a great opportunity to learn emotional self-regulations and being able to, you know, each children, how to socially interact in those situations rather than allowing it, you know, this device to you know, to take over, to try to do the work. I think that great work like right from the get-go about how to have social and social interaction and how to literally interact with the environment and humans.

Shaun Newman:

You know, I, sorry I got off track. No, no, no,

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:
No. I’m very passionate about this.

Shaun Newman:

It’s it’s, it’s perfectly fine. This is what a podcast is all about. This is what I love right here. I told you I was in my happy place before we started. So you can’t, I love a good discussion. I love learning things. I I think, I think you mentioned judgemental. So we’ll use me as a case in point where I’ve got three young kids four, four, and under, and at times, you know, both myself and my wife both worked full-time jobs. So you come home and you’re trying to put on supper, you’re trying to do this. You’re trying to do that. And to flick on the TV, you’re absolutely bang on it is a way to grab their attention so you can finish what you need to get done in order to carry on. And so I think, you know, when it comes to what’s going on today, there’s more and more families working, two jobs, right? So you got, you got parents going both ways, which isn’t a bad thing. I’m not knocking on that whatsoever. I think it’s great. I think that’s, you know, I’m doing it in my life. I, my wife wants to be just as fulfilled as I do in a career and, and trying to chase things.

Shaun Newman:

But one of the things that comes at the end of that is it is when you get home and you get your kids there, you have to be pretty in the moment to realize and understand that you can’t just turn off your brain, give them the TV. And that way you get a few moments to yourself. That’s what you’re, that’s what you’re getting at. Because by doing that, you’re, you’re setting up a lot of failure down the road and you just don’t understand it. Cause you can’t see it happen immediately. Like that takes time, you know? And we w you talk a lot about the seven CS, I think it is. And one of them is consistency. Well, what is consistency do over a week? Nah, not really a whole bunch. I mean, everybody’s been to the gym where you go to the gym for a week or two, you feel fricking awesome.

Shaun Newman:

But if you don’t continue to do that, it doesn’t compound, right? So you want to lose weight, let’s take weight or you want to gain muscle. You go to the gym for two weeks. You might lose a bit away. Heck you might feel good. But if you don’t continue that trend for the next year, 10 years, that falls off pretty quick. Same thing can be said about a TV or a video game or anything. If it’s once in a while the effects, I would assume wouldn’t be so, you know, measurable. But when it becomes eight, nine hours a day consistently month after month after month, I can see where that adds up. And I can see man, that is, that is a scary thought for parents these days. I understand why it’s easy, right? Your kid goes downstairs and they’re out of your hair. Oh, that’s good. They’re, they’re keeping themselves entertained. But when the entertainment may be, has a very well as a downside that we just haven’t fully understood yet. I get what you’re saying. And I don’t think you’re taking the conversation away from something you’re passionate about. That’s what a good conversation is all about. Something that people are passionate about.

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

Well, and I think it’s, you know, you said your mid thirties, I’m, you know, mid fifties here. And, but what, what I wasn’t like you and I have life skills where we can have that self control and we can step back and, and, you know, monitor our behavior. I think, you know, task a 10 year old or an eight year old or a 16 year old to have that. It’s I think you’re asking a lot and that that’s, that, that’s that part again, that you’re getting those. If people, you know, I would encourage anybody to look at Steven Kotler’s work about the, the flow, the flow experience and the type of chemicals better released when you get into that flow state. And that’s why like, you know, to be outdoors, you can, you can get into that, that natural high and beneficial for the brain. As opposed to, you know, that’s the part, I think a lot of the kids I’ve had since they’ve some of the kids have watched this program. I think it, even now that they’re more aware that this is what’s going on, it’s still difficult for them to put that, put that device down.

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

Like the one that we hear all the time at our office is John. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you for making me aware of this, but what do I do instead now? Like, you know, so this, I said, what, what would be something that you could do with your friends rather than doing, you know, call it, call of duty? Well, I I’ll go ride my bike. And and then all of a sudden it’s like, well, this one friend is not allowed to ride her bike and, and you know, well, I don’t want to go ride a ride, my bike, you know, by myself. And, and it’s, then you hear all these different things, the command that we’re talking about, healthy choices, healthy, alternative choices. And then I hear all this, well, that’s going to be harder. That’s going to be, you know, this it’s going to be that.

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

And so that’s part of, I’m not an addiction as an addiction specialist by any means, but these are the kinds of things that like, like you mentioned about your, you and your wife, like in some families, like I know in ours, like for that for four o’clock, you know, window to six o’clock no one’s at home. Like there might there, like, because both parents are working and in that for, you know, that two hour window, okay. What what’s going on? Like, you know, and if, if that iPad is, is there it’s tough. Like, it’s, it’s, it’s a really tough dilemma for parents and for the kids. And I, and I don’t know if there’s an easy, easy answer for it. I know for hockey guys, I I’ve literally seen, you know, in the, in the Western hockey league where guys, you know, like they have the more the morning skate and I might get myself into a lot of trouble with this. But I I’ve had kids where they haven’t had a simple water shot, like not a simple art from the moment they woke up. They haven’t had a sip of water. They hadn’t eaten anything, but guess how much time they’d been on their phone prior to that morning skate,

Shaun Newman:

As soon as you wake up.

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

Yeah. And then next thing you know, they’re going on the ice now, am I saying that that’s going to cause a question? No, I’m not saying that I’m saying it, it’s making you more vulnerable. That that’s what I, and that’s not just me. That’s what the research is also showing. And I think you know, it’s, I love what the league has done, you know, all the leagues they’re, they’re, they’re, I think they’re doing a way better job of you know, managing concussions and all that. But I think there’s a lot of stuff that needs to be on the front end of things, in terms of preventing, you know, and, and, and the, the, the media stuff, the, the electronics, I think there’s a lot of work that still needs to be done.

Shaun Newman:

Well, a couple of things that come to mind is the phone thing specifically with kids, you know, when you’re talking about trying to get them to do different things, instead of call of duty, that kind of thing is, it’s kind of, it goes kind of back to where we started with the alcohol. The phone thing is kind of, well that’s right. And once again, I look at my kids, right. And I’ve watched social dilemma and my wife and I have talked a ton about it, and we don’t want our kids to be exposed to any of that, like, until they’re able to handle it. Right. So what’s that, I don’t know, high school, well, imagine the social pressure that’s going to come in between those years when the world everyone’s getting an iPad, everybody’s got a phone. Everybody wants to know where everyone is at all times, blah, blah, blah.

Shaun Newman:

So the pressure on them is going to be no different than, and I assume you’ve gone through with alcohol. The other thing you brought up is okay, being by herself. And I think we all you know, I’m, I’m obviously I enjoy talking to people a little bit of an extrovert. I like hearing things, but I think a lot of us struggle, including myself with just being by yourself. I was thinking, ah, it was yesterday night. I took the dogs for a walk and normally I listened to a podcast and audio book music. I don’t like quiet. I like learning things. I like constantly on the go. And when I started reading about you a couple of days ago, you talked a lot of boats, quieting the brain and, and kind of being in the moment. And I went, you know what, I’m going to walk the dogs without anything on, let’s just see how it goes, right?

Shaun Newman:

Like, I mean, and it’s, it’s a completely new experience and I’m not sitting here saying it was a spiritual or transform me, but just to understand how much technology we jam into the brain from the moment you wake up to the moment you go to bed is, you know, compared to what I don’t know, John, you tell me, is it 50 years ago? I certainly know him by interviewing a lot of the people who are community pillars from the Lloydminster area, old farmers, where they had no power and an outhouse and right. Like the amount of information we’re jamming in our bodies compared to what they did is completely night and day.

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

Yeah, absolutely. Absolutely. No. And you’ll, and you look at those pictures. I always love when they show kind of the history of the, the making of Braden Holtby, as I might call it in there, he is in the middle and in a farmer’s field skating by himself, just taking a pocket and shooting in it and to a net. It’s you’re right. Like you’re seeing, like, I dunno, maybe, maybe I’m wrong, Sean, but I think we’re seeing less and less and less of, of that. Speaking of Braden, Holtby,

Shaun Newman:

Him being a hometown hero from our area Stanley cup winner, Vezina trophy winner. Now all Vancouver connect, which is odd to say you got to work with him from a very young age. And I know in talking with the Braden when he was on, Oh, a few months ago, at least he was in the bubble at the same time. He talked about being a young guy and having a temper and, and you helping them along with that for the listeners, from our area. Could we talk a little bit about young Braden Holtby working with working with you and the experience of that and what you’ve seen him grow and develop throughout the years,

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

Where do I begin? Just unbelievable work ethic. Very passionate wants to make a difference. I think he’s going to be a great leader in Vancouver on and off the ice. He just goes about his business for, for Brayden. You know, one of the C’s and we talk about mental toughness is coachability. Braden is a very, very coachable guy. There’s a lot of guys in the NHL where, you know, and I’m sure you’ve seen this cause you, you, you played pro is a coach, might suggest an idea to them and they, they really, their ego gets up and they get angry Brayden throughout his career. You know, we, we joked about it a long time ago that Braden you’re going to have a lot of, you know, goalie coaches, you know, and I think in Washington, he had five, six alone.

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

And what made him so good is he would take different ideas from different guys you know, off and off on the ice. And that takes a special person to have that openness and, you know, and, and Brayden, Oh my gosh, what an athlete, like what an athlete and, you know, when Mitch corn, you know, came in and did a lot of, you know, significant changes to have that openness to, to try that. To me that just speaks volumes about you know, who, who Braden is and, and the work that Scott Murray has done with him. It’ll be interesting to see how things go with with Ian, Ian Clark another, another goalie coach. But Brayden, you know, when Brayden was so good, I mean, like, he was like one of the best goalies in the Western hockey league. You know, that ability to stay poised, you know, and that ability to stay especially when things are going well.

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

And I think that’s where, when I showed Braden that side, he was open to work on it. And and I, and I mean, it’s like, and I’ve said this several times when Brayden gave me the show note a few years ago I honestly, I was more mortified because Greg did a phenomenal job, you know, teaching him the fundamentals. I mean, I’d never seen it. Like Braden was such a phenomenal skater you know, and full when, when I started working with them with the SAS lates to have that openness to different things on and off the ice. And we did at first days, John were, we hadn’t, we didn’t, we’re doing ball drills and the hallways and various too, you know, like there, his team mates are gone. They’ve been home for two hours and there’s Brayden Brayden, you know, let’s do it again, John let’s do it again. It was like I wanna like, so in some ways like his perfectionism was like amazing, but at the same, it was also, he had to learn not to be so perfect and the hockey is not a perfect and just step back and work on that part of his game. And to have coachability that was, that’s the thing. And he’s just,

Shaun Newman:

No, that’s all I can think of is you mentioned about 10 things about Brayden. And I just think, man, when a kid like that comes along, because not all kids are like that, like I even think about myself, right? Every once in a while you hear somebody, you know, if you’re like five inches taller, you would have been in the show and it’s like, yeah. Would I have been, I don’t know, like I hear the stories and now, right. And Hopi is the absolute pinnacle of success in the goaltending world. But when you hear those stories that go, man, those are special kids, you know, you hear the stories of Connor McDavid and his ability to just like always play. He always wanted to play and he always wanted to train and, and most people aren’t like that. They want a break. And I just feel like, and you would have saw it firsthand. I guess John’s maybe the question is when that kid comes along, you gotta, that must stick out as like, man, this is going to be special. This kid is special.

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

Well, I was really lucky because when I was in when I was a goalie coach for the Kootney ice, I had Brad Lau, who’s the head coach for the oil Kings now. And then in Saskatoon, I had Dave [inaudible] and Dave was no head coach for the Regina pats. And Shawn, when you would watch stru, like I would set up these drills with Brayden and stru and here’s strew she’s in his mid thirties, no knees left and, and all my gosh, the battle levels, the compete levels. Like I was so blessed because I had such great assistant coaches at the time that would be, and you know, Brad played pro hockey, competitive guy, and, you know, here’s these teenagers, you know, bring it on old bad. And that all I did was set up the drill and then, you know, work on the mechanical part, the technical part, but all my gosh, it was to sit back and watch these, you know, battles.

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

And that’s what made Braden, Braden was so competitive. And he’s like, you know, like, and they would make these games like had nothing to do with me here. I’m sitting and watching back and I’m watching these guys. And you know, I remember in Saskatoon, I think I, I would hope, I hope guys have good memories of that, but you know, guys, guys would go down and practice and take a shot on, on Braden. And I turned around and I’d say, yeah, I got that at Tim Horton’s this morning, that fricking muffin. You know, maybe you, maybe you need to go to the gym a little bit more and it turned around and did my goalie coat that there are a goalie coach. Just tell me that, like that I’m a, I’m a, I’m a West. And so now I would, you know, do the chirp in.

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

I would do, I do lots of chirp and practice. And I got, I wanted the guys to go down. You know, and, and rip pucks are like, I had an earlier experience. Like I was so blessed like in being in Edmonton. I, I’m not proud to say this, but I, I skipped school one day and I still can’t remember how I, how I got, got into the building, but I went down and I watched the Oilers practice and we’re talking, this is when Andy mole grad fear and all those guys, you know, and he got Curry, messy, all these phenomenal. I don’t think it was coincidence that Andy Morgan grand fear were such great goalies because look who is shooting on them every day. Right? Like you, and you got that kind of quality shots. So one thing I always tried to do, you know, when I was coaching in the Western hockey league was we would have these fun drills, like after practice, a lot of the coaches would give us that good half an hour, 40 minutes.

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

And I wanted the forwards that like, just, you know, like we’d have battles. If you lose, you gotta do pushups. You gotta do, you know all this stuff. And we created a lot of battles. And that’s the part like for me, you were talking earlier about the, you know, the, after, like that’s the part that I did. I really love all those little games and the battles and, and, and again, the assistant coaches. And I don’t think it’s coincidence that they’re, they’ve went on to be head coaches. They, they just were so passionate and wanting to develop the goalie. Sue was, it was fun, fun to watch.

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

And Brayden was so, so responsible.

Shaun Newman:

One thing I want to ask you about is I’ve heard you quote Tony Robbins before and saying that success leaves clues as a guy who has been around a lot of successful organizations, successful athletes, successful people. I mean, you’ve worked with, if I wrote that down, right. I think you’ve worked with the ballet, the army all types of athletes from all different spectrums business people, entrepreneurs. So you’ve got to be around of what I would consider very successful people. Has there been any clues left that you’ve saw or picked up on trends similarities across whether it is the person in Winnipeg ballet or it’s the Braden Holtby? Yeah.

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

The ability to focus, the ability to be in the moment. You know, and again, all the research shows now that when you get into that flow state, when you get into the zone being able to focus, be 100% absorbed into what you’re, what you’re doing. That’s been, whether you’re a surgeon or pilot, a hockey player that just 100% absorption is been you know, the Elon Musk, like, honestly, I’ve never met the man, but, you know, from the moment he wakes up to the moment when he goes to bed, which I think is like four hours of sleep from what I’ve heard, but he’s just so like, so present that that’s been the characteristic that I seen it. And that’s one of the reasons why I got into mindfulness because they’ve shown that, you know, mindfulness is, is literally weight training for the brain and it can be a heat just turned out because everybody’s using it, but a hack, like it can be a brain hack to allow people to, you know, get, get more present more into, into the moment.

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

So that that’s been the common denominator that I’ve really seen over the last decade. And, and that’s one of the things that that’s why I teach meditation. And you know, you’re, I, it’s the first time I met you, you look like a big strong burly guy and you turn around and say, you know, Hey, Sean, I want you to just go sit in the corner and just get quiet. And you have to show that guy why that would be, you know, like, cause I always ask my guys, you know, like when they’re playing hockey, what do you do all this training for? You know, whether it be power skating in the gym, cognitive, perceptual, mental, whatever it may be, what do you do all this training for it? And I always get the answer while to get better,

Shaun Newman:

All the words out of my head to get better.

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

Right. And that’s true, but that’s not the main reason. Like if you go back and think of some of the best games you played that night, Sean, like in, throughout your career, and if you came off the ice and I’m interviewing you and I’m saying, Hey Sean, what were you thinking about tonight when you were playing 99% of the time, guess what your answer’s going to be. I wasn’t as just doing what I do, I escape and shoot and pass and just do what I do. And so to me, when athletes are playing their best, when anybody’s doing their best and they’ve actually shown us now, you know, the, the prefrontal cortex goes offline. It, you get into this quiet, quiet mind. And like you just mentioned the other day at night, just taking, taking the dogs for a walk. I would argue you were in that flow state. And that’s, that’s one of the things that I do a lot now is teaching clients how to get into that, that, that type of practice. And it is a practice daily practice.

Shaun Newman:

And it’s uncomfortable to at sometimes monitor your thoughts. I I do it now. I started this podcast, John, back in February, 2019. And I remember I used to listen. I used to do one episode a week and I used to listen to every episode cause I want to get better. I still want to get better. And what I couldn’t get over was how often I didn’t listen to the guest and what I started doing, honestly, it’s already happened to me probably five times since we started it was I got, I got a, I got a separate, I got a separate screen. Right? So in theory, if we ever get bogged down, all of a sudden, we’re not talking anymore, I can go, Oh let’s pick a topic and away we go again. Right. But I’ve found and I could be wrong. There’s only been a couple of guys who proved this theory wrong is that if you’re in it, like you’re talking about be in the moment you’re going to pick up on something and let that actually end. The problem I got now is when I listened to people, I get too many ideas. I’m like, Oh my God. Right. And it’s trying to just declutter that so that you get down, but being in the moment I, yeah, I think that’s, I think that’s awesome. It’s hard to do all the time. It’s hard. And maybe it’s impossible to do. I’m not, I’m not a hundred percent sure. But to be in the moment and being engaged I, I completely get that.

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

That’s been the common denominator that I’ve seen

Shaun Newman:

Is it they’re engaged. They know how to just like focus in.

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

Yep. Oh, that’s cool.

Shaun Newman:

Well, I don’t want to hold you here all day. We got the final little piece here that I do with all my guests. It’s accrued crude master final five, a shout out to Heath and Tracy McDonald sponsors of the podcast since the very beginning believers in the podcast. Since the very beginning, it’s just five quick questions, longer as short as you want to go. I got no timeframe. But I want to get you back to your Saturday and Halloween and everything else. So if you could recommend one book to the listeners or to myself, what what’s one that’s caught your attention lately or in the past.

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

We’ll will can you see, can you see that Shaun

Shaun Newman:

Breathe golf? Yes.

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

The one thing I love about this, this lady she’s from the UK you can say, I get a lot of my hockey players. This is interesting. More, more and more guys, Sean are getting open to meditation, but you’ll hear, okay, I’m going to pull out my insight timer. I’m going to pull out calm. I’m going to pull out Headspace. And I have, I have one American hockey league goalie and he says, Johnny, I got it. I do this already. He says, I use my Headspace every day. But the problem is with that is what are you going to do? Like pull out your Headspace in that moment and say, wait a second, guys, I gotta do my meditation. No like what you want. In my opinion, I think guided meditations initially are good because it helps. It helps the client makes it easier, but you eventually want to get it to the point where you can do it anywhere, any time, any place on your own. So for me the brief golf sheet, and it sounds even if you’re not a golfer, you can take this. If you were a surgeon, you could read this book, take the principles from it and apply it to, you could take it and apply it to your, your, your podcast. So I that’s, and it’s these taking ancient, ancient wisdom that has a science grounded in science now. So that, that’s one of the things that I really love about that book.

Shaun Newman:

I, I will gladly pick up a book. I love a love, a good new book. So if you’re suggesting I’m going to have to sit down and read it now if you could sit and do this, where you sit across from another guy, one guy and pick their brain, like I’m picking your brain. Is there a guy you’d like to do that with or gal for that matter? Greg Norman, who is Greg Norman,

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

He was a pro golfer. He was see the gray, the gray, the white shark. Great white shark.

Shaun Newman:

Okay. That’s a new one. Okay.

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

He the, I was like Comey to watch Nick Faldo and what Dave led better. I was a huge golfer, like huge golfer. And I, in fact I felt bad. I was more of a golf, a more passionate golfer than I was a hockey hockey guy. And you know, when Greg Norman had the Epic collapse at the masters and how that could, that that event could single handedly, you know, not just your, your sporting life, but your life and how, how mentally resilient Greg Norman was to that. That’s funny. I would love to hear he was, you know, re you know, in my opinion, from what outside, like, you know, didn’t let that get to him. That’s the guy I’d love to interview.

Shaun Newman:

Yeah. Well, that’s fantastic. How about someone you’d like to work with, if you could pick a golfer current athlete or anyone across the spectrum that’s currently out there making things happen. Is there someone that you’d like to, you know, sit down and, and work with them?

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

That’s, that’s a great question Shaun.

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

I love working with young goalies. I really, I really, I love so any of the new up and coming, I know that’s going to sound big, but any of the new up and coming young goalie, like, like barter hearts, like who’ve got that, that passion that drive, they, they really want to make a difference. So I can mention his name on the air, but I’ve got a guy right now that, that I love working with them. He’s, he’s, he really works on every area of his game. So I love, you know, any of those goalies that are, I would say, 16 to 24. I, I love that they really want to get to that next level. I that’s my ideal client. I love working with guys like that, and it’s fine. It makes your day a lot of fun.

Shaun Newman:

Well, if you could speak, if we’ve got, if we have goalies listening right now, young goalies, if there’s one piece that they get a piece of advice from you, you could give them to work on, maybe say their mental game. What would be one piece of advice you’d give them?

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

Well, it was interesting, I guess, watched the podcast the other day, LA Lyle mast unbelievable goalie coach does a lot of work with head trajectory. It’s a very foundational piece of goaltending. And here you got, I think there was 20 young guys at this symposium. Maybe they did it virtual. I bet you, there was guys Sean that walked away gone, whatever, but I, I would say have an open mind because you’re, you’re gonna, if you’re a 10 year old goalie nowadays, like, you know, when I did it, like I maybe had one or two goalie coaches and that was it there there’s, you know, like if a young guy starts at eight or nine, and if he does get to pro hockey, he might have 10 to 12 goalie coaches in that time, especially when you go to these hockey, Canada, you’ve got all these great goalie coaches coming.

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

And that’s what I would say to anybody. Just, you don’t have to, you don’t have to do everything everybody’s asking you to do, but just have an open mind to hear different ideas and different suggestions, whether it be physical, technical, tactical, mental, and you know, not to try to do a plug, but in bull Matt in goal magazine. That’s the one thing I love about Hutchin Kev, a literally assembled all the best coaches in the world are nutritionist. Anything to do with goaltending to, to not go in. And I know there’s Prague, there’s pro goalies. This is, that’s what I love about there. There’s pro goalies that go in and listen to those podcasts because they still, you know, there there’s guys, I can’t, again, can’t mention names, but they’re in their thirties and they’re still listening to that because they have that openness, they park their ego and they say, yeah, I want to just get better, whatever I can do to stop more pucks. And I that’s, what I would say is having that openness, that coachability

Shaun Newman:

That’s a good lesson for anyone, anyone, it doesn’t matter whether you’re 30, 20, or 80, you want to get better every day.

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

Constant, constant never-ending improvement. Can I

Shaun Newman:

That’s right. Your final one, a fun one. Cause you mentioned Wim Hoff at the start. Where’s the craziest place that you’ve Wim Hoff done the Wim Hof method of getting in cold water.

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

Are you familiar with Edith Cavell and Jasper?

Shaun Newman:

I can’t say I am, but I’m going to look it up on a map like immediately.

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

There’s a glacier angel glacier. It’s all my gosh. It’s, it’s hauntingly beautiful. There, I literally did the Wim Hoff this summer in, in the glacier Lake. It was minus eight, the water, and I went in there for five minutes and to be in that glacier water was absolutely yeah, it was, it was spectacular. It was amazing.

Shaun Newman:

What is it about the Wim Hof method that is attracted to you, attracted you to it, but then on top of it, like kept you going, like what, what was it, I mean, I’m assuming you liked the, the, the mindset of what it’s about, but after dunking yourself in cold water over and over and over again, what is it, what is it about that experience that has just obviously made you a huge fan of it?

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

There there’s several things like from a physical point of view, I have just all the years playing hockey, I’ve had many knee surgeries. So when you’re in the water you get this analgesic it’s really helped me to manage my arthritis a lot more. That that’s one of the things in Alberta, we have so many beautiful glacier lakes, like Lake minnow, Wonka, upper Canada, ASCUS five lakes. So just like you were saying, Sean, the other night when you were walking your dogs, like so when you’re in those lakes, you, is that absorption, like, it’s your, it’s a meditative. You just feel the only way and I’m not going to do it. Justice is you just feel so alive. And for me like I will go out in my backyard today and I’ll go sit in the cold tub and you just get into this quiet mind.

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

It there’s just because you’re so into your body. You’re, you’re so into your senses, that’s one of the things that I’ve loved about the Wim Hoff is you’re literally get into your, your, your senses. And then I’ve been really blessed. There’s a, a company in Calgary called one breath Vincent and Leanna Kraus. You should, I think you should have them on there, on your podcasts now. And the one great thing about their workshops is that sense of community. I it’s one thing to do the breath work when you’re doing it by yourself, but when you go to these workshops and you’re surrounded by people now, obviously with COVID, but when I’ve done these workshops in the past, and you hear that the energy level and again, it’s hard to describe in words, but that kind of bonding and community.

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

And when you, like, I’ve been blessed, my girlfriend G will like Lake Wabamun is like 25 minutes away. And that when you share that experience with people, it’s, it’s, it’s truly amazing. I’ve been, and when you get people it’s so fun. Like our, our, our, like my, our two girls we, we like, we love to go to Nordegg and both of them went in the river this year as like one of our 11 year old girl, Sophia. She floated down the river with me and she was terrified, but absolutely exhilarated and sh, and you could just see her confidence level. So for me, when I’ve had a lot of great experience personally, but when you see these transformations in people, it’s a little bit, maybe, I don’t know, maybe like the firewalk that Tony Robbins does or bursting through the panel, but when you’ve been at these workshops and you see, like, I can’t do this, I can’t do this. I can’t do no, no, no, no. It helps in your life. And you see this power, like you just see this unbelievable power come through people. It’s, it’s cool to watch Matt. It’s fine.

Shaun Newman:

So the word shock comes up to mind, like it’s shock mindfulness. It forces you into your body because if you’ve ever sat in a cold tub, and I know, I think I talked about this right off the hop. I can’t think of anything else, but the, what you’re doing and why on earth are you doing it? Cause it’s not an, the, the first time, at least the first time for me, I don’t know if the word enjoyable would be used the feeling after like coming out of the cold tub and how it made your body feel was amazing, but actually forcing yourself in there and having to sit through. And I can’t remember three, five minutes, whatever it was, man, the, the, the feeling your feet get is you just can’t recreate that. So I, I it’s, to me, it, it reminds me of, of like shocking yourself into going inwards, because you have to like, there’s no choice in the matter.

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

Well, and I think people learn a lot of times with anxiety and depression, sometimes people want to feel that. And so they push away from it. And the one thing with the cold water is you start to mentally, physically in every aspect, you’ll learn to be with it. And the more you’re accepting of it, acknowledging of it, knowing that it’s, we know what goes up, must come down and when you can just be with it, that’s that’s when I see I’ve seen huge, huge breakthroughs you know, like, and, and I would encourage anybody, like, I mean, there’s, I’ve been in cold lakes for half an hour. I don’t encourage anybody to go into Abraham Lake and Nordic for half an hour, but I literally started to just over two years ago, I started with 15 seconds of a cold shower, 15 literally 15 seconds. And I would just encourage, like, I love when I see kids doing this because they learn how to break through barriers and the beauty thing. Again, going back to what we started talking about nowhere, that’s a healthy alternative to sitting there playing call of duty, and you can learn about yourself and you can be in nature and you can be in the out of doors and just have this useful experience, you know where it doesn’t cost you a Sam.

Shaun Newman:

Well, I tell you what, that’s one heck of a way to end an episode. Cause I, I, I agree with what you’re saying and, and makes me want to rethink my Wim Hoff ex a couple of experiences where you it’s a shock value, man, but before I let you go how can people find you, John? You want to give your, if you’re on social media website, that kind of thing.

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

Yeah. So we are, our company is called zone performance psychology. There’s two branches. There’s our one website is zone performance.ca and that’s more the performance side of things. And then on our other, our clinical for concussion rehab, anxiety, ADHD, depression, migraines it’s zone zone, psych.com. We’re on Instagram. Our phone number is (780) 803-5646. We offer free consultations. We want to let people know what we do and what we’re all about. And again, I can’t thank you enough for, for allowing me to be on the podcast today.

Shaun Newman:

Well, no, it’s been, it’s been a pleasure. It’s been an enjoyable hour, so thanks again and enjoy your Halloween and hopefully we’ll talk soon.

John Stevenson Sports & Performance Psychologist:

Okay. Take care. Thank you so much.

Shaun Newman:

Hey folks, thanks again for joining us today. If you just stumbled on the show and like what you hear, please click subscribe. Remember every Monday and Wednesday, a new guest will be sitting down to share their story. The Shawn Newman podcast is available for free on Apple, Spotify, YouTube, and wherever else you find your podcasts fix until next time.

 

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